How To Build A MicroEye

MicroEye in Wireless World



The copy of Wireless World containing the hardware design for what would become Digithurst’s MicroEye along with driving software written in Z80 assembler for the Research machines 380Z

Peter Howard’s letter



With Peter Howard’s help Stephen Cronk sorted out some issues with components used in the design

A robot we intended to sell with the system



The Smart Arm Robot we initially envisaged using with the Digithurst robot vision system

 A 6809 development system from Sterling Microcomputers



Another piece of equipment we couldn’t afford; A 6809 development system from Sterling Microcomputers

Interfacing Adrian March’s GE camera to a Commodore PET

Interfacing Adrian March’s GE camera to a Commodore PET



Juggling figures while interfacing Adrian March’s GE camera to a Commodore PET

Translating edge detection and object recognition algorithms



Translating edge detection and object recognition algorithms

Yet another hybrid technical and financial plan



Yet another hybrid technical and financial plan

Digithurst’s first PCB acetate



Digithurst’s first PCB acetate; unfortunately not good enough for our local printed circuit board manufacturer, Trulon

The growing realisation that the GE camera was too expensive



The growing realisation that the GE camera was too expensive

Minutes of an early management meeting



Minutes of an early management meeting at which we decided on what stationary we could afford to have printed



Digithurst Profit and Loss 1984



A last minute rush of orders limited the losses for the first year of trading. A large contract and the BBC micro put us on course for steady growth during the second year and beyond



Digithurst Balance Sheet 1984



1984 ended with a little money in the bank